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How Cybersecurity Fits Into Disaster Recovery

Having a disaster recovery plan is essential when you’re trying to keep your business and its reputation safe. In addition to focusing on details such as how you’ll function during adverse weather, you need to focus on cybersecurity. By learning more about the way cybersecurity and disaster recovery intersect, you can reduce the impact on your business if the worst happens.

Decide what requires your protection

The essence of a disaster recovery plan is to protect your organization’s data. To ensure your plan is extra-efficient, you need to choose exactly what it is you’re going to protect.

For example, if your business represents many clients, and you need to hold information about them to continue operating, what information is the most important? After you’ve identified the type of information that’s most important, you can move onto protecting it against one of the biggest cybersecurity threats: ransomware.

According to Business Insider, ransomware generates around $25 million for hackers each year. As it’s such a financially juicy target, it’s safe to assume that your most important information is at risk too. By gathering that data and backing it up in a safe space such as the cloud, you can lessen the impact if ransomware takes hold.

Treating all devices as a gateway for disaster

Most people in the United States own a smartphone. Many also have their own laptops and tablets. As a result, more employers are allowing employees to access company information remotely. The benefits of remote access include being able to work at home, working during a commute, and being able to contact the office while on business trips.

Unfortunately, every device that can access your business’s information is a gateway for a disaster. At the same time, those same devices can act as vital tools when disasters strike elsewhere. To prevent devices from becoming disaster gateways, ensure employees receive ample training on cybersecurity threats and identifying phishing emails. To make the most of your employees’ devices, ensure they’re equipped with everything they need for remote access when adverse weather hits.

Consider where you’ll need to mitigate impacts

It’s an unfortunate fact that disaster will hit all businesses at some point. While that may be certain, it isn’t clear just how badly the effects will be. Although you can’t predict the future, you can try to offset impacts in advance.

To offset impacts in advance, consider what the most disastrous element of a cybersecurity threat would be. For example, if a successful DDOS attack were to bring your website down and prevent customers from making transactions, how could you minimize downtime? Or, if a data breach results in highly sensitive information leaking elsewhere, what steps can you take to reduce the impact on your clients?

For most businesses, the biggest impact of a cybersecurity disaster is financial. On average, breached client records cost an organization $150 for each one. In the healthcare industry, the cost rises to $429. You may benefit from identifying potential costs to your business during a disaster and then consider ways to prevent or reduce them.

When examining how cybersecurity and disaster recovery intersect, always create a solid plan. If your business encounters any changes, ensure you update your plan accordingly. It’s always worth reviewing your plan as time goes on too, so you can make sure you’re abreast of the latest threats.